Olly Writes

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Tag Archives: sharpening

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March suddenly seems very very close and I’m concerned that the progress with my workshop clearout and decluttering may not reach the stage at which I am hoping for by then… To give you all a bit of an update though, I thought I’d share a few previously-unmentioned items that I, as of last week, decided I am going to add to the ever-growing ‘For Sale’ list.

If you’d like a price on something, please find a way to contact me, whether that’s by leaving a comment here, by e-mailing me directly or through social media.

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Pencil Sharpening

While the cutting boards I’m working on are slowly nearing completion, I found a little time yesterday evening to shoot a brief video on sharpening a pencil in the workshop. It’s hopefully a little bit of fun and a little light-hearted more than anything else but it’s mostly to keep my channel ‘busy’ as I’m well aware that it’s been a couple of weeks since Part 1.

As always, I welcome your thoughts and comments. If you have any of your own suggestions for sharpening then please feel free to share. What would be even better are your tips for not losing pencils in the first place! 😉

Thank you.

WorkSharp DMT Diamond

Today’s video came up in my YouTube subscription feed, recently:

There’s also the full review of this system, over at New Woodworker.com.

This looks like an excellent solution for owners of the Work Sharp system. These Magna-Discs do appear to be available from Rutlands, for those of us in the UK. It’s just a shame that the initial outlay is so steep… But, if they last as long as the claims (fifty-times a standard abrasive disc?!) then, it’s got to be worth the investment for any tradesman or professional who uses their tool sharpener on a daily basis.

It’s the use of magnetic technology that really appeals to me. Could this be the future for abrasive discs? If only they can find a way to reduce the costs… I know that not everyone gets along well with the velcro hook-and-loop attachments. I’ve come across posts where woodworkers say that the backing pads on their sanders have lost their grip, for example (it’s not uncommon).

Thanks for looking.

Veritas Small Blade Holder

As mentioned briefly in my previous post, I recently purchased Veritas’ Small Blade Holder from Rutlands, which is designed to solve the common problem applying the right amount of pressure to a small blade or iron when sharpening or honing. I don’t know about you but, I’ve always struggled to get a good edge on spokeshave blades unless they’re crudely fitted in to a slot cut in to the end of a length of 2x2in, for example. So, I was waiting eagerly for this product to arrive; to see if it would solve all those other issues. Veritas are renown for producing top-quality goods with a hint of innovation and it’s claimed that these holders will fit in to a honing guide for repeat angles and accuracy…

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Review: Work Sharp 3000

So, the Work Sharp 3000 has been in my workshop for a few days now. With all the snow and plummeting temperatures this past week, my time spent in the workshop has been severely limited. Still, I’ve managed to have a ‘play’ on my new tool sharpener for a certain period of each day and now, I feel ready to share my initial thoughts and experiences.

Contents of the current offer, available only at Rutlands (for the UK).

Click Here to Read On…

A Sharpening Solution

It was almost two-years-ago the day when I purchased my first bench grinder from Yandles in Martock (Somerset).  Like many others on the market, it was a simple high-speed machine with  one wheel on either end (one coarse, one fine). Despite buying a couple of excellent Veritas jigs, I never really got on with this set up. I’m paranoid about sparks so, each time I need to regrinding a plane iron or chisel, I had to set this up on my Workmate outside – much to the bemusement of those passing by! It would vibrate [truing the wheels would possibly have cured that] and, if you weren’t patient enough to let the edge cool then, you’d end up over-heating and burning your tool, which basically means the steel loses it’s temper (not long before I lost mine, as well! ). Continue reading…

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