Olly Writes

Woodwork, writing, walks, DIY and more!

Tag Archives: miter

Tea Tray Repair

Following on from the video highlighted in my previous post; let’s now take a closer look at the repairs I made to the hardwood serving tray.

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Part 2 Has Finally Arrived!

If not for the difficulties I’ve had in trying to upload this video (coupled with the time I’ve spent agonising over a SketchUp drawing for a future magazine article) then, I’ve have had this second instalment online for you much sooner!

Part 2 in my series on making an octagonal towel stand.

It looks as though this is going to become another three-part series after all. I’ve tried hard to trim this second episode down as much as possible but, I feel I’ve got a lot of useful content in there. I start by turning the square post in to an octagonal section (picking up from where Part 1 left off) and getting everything ready for the finishing stage, which will come in Part 3, along with the assembly.

Sorry that you’ve had to wait so long for this. Hope that it’s been worth it, though! Smile

I’d also like to thank Joe Abbott for pointing me in the direction of Windows Live Writer, which is compatible with any blogging software and is free to download. It’s dead easy to use and allows me to blog in ‘visual editor mode’ where WordPress appears to have started playing up for me of late (thanks again, Joe! Winking smile).

Thanks for viewing.

Bench Repair (Part 1)

Fear not – that title bears no relevance to my workbench!! 😉

A few years ago, my mum purchased this two-seater bench-and-table combination piece, probably from one of the many catalogues she keeps under the stairs… It’s made from some kind of dark or ‘red’ hardwood and although, at first glance, you may think this timber looks quite durable, a closer look at the slats on one of the seats tells a different story…

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Storing Bandsaw Blades

With all that’s gone in recently inside my workshop (reorganisation, etc.), I’ve again found myself up against the challenge of conveniently and safely storing bandsaw blades. When I had my smaller bandsaw, I could happily hang all my blades inside the plywood base cabinet I had made. But, with the Startrite 401e being such a monster and all, sitting that on top of any kind of box construction really isn’t an option. So, I’ve had to hang them elsewhere (for now) on the right-hand end of my mitre saw station:

Having put up a load of spur shelving in recent weeks, I really don’t have the wall space to spare for an alternative solution. That hook is one that I bought as a bulk pack from Toolstation and, as I had a scrap length lying around, I decided to line it with foam pipe insulation or lagging, which should do a good job of protecting the teeth (which are, of course, all pointing inwards!).

It would’ve been nice if I still had some space for a wall-mounted cabinet but, for now, I’ll have to see how this system works… I don’t really envisage ever having more blades than this collection ‘in stock’ at one time so, that shouldn’t be a problem. There is still the threat (albeit, a minor one) that the teeth on this nearside could pose a thread to passers by but, I think of much else to be concerned about beyond that.

How do you store your bandsaw blades?

Thanks for reading.

Revised Mitre Saw Station

Late last year, I mentioned that I wasn’t happy with the current setup of the mitre saw station I built back in 2008 (almost two-years to the month). The design itself was fine; for me, it’s just too inconvenient for a small workshop. Over the course of several weeks and following the arrival of my new sliding mitre saw, I’ve successfully managed to re-build this unit in to a station that’ll work much better for me.

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Makita LS1013 (Part 1)

Having had a Makita LS1013 in my workshop for over a week now, I can see already that I’m going to get more joy out of this than what I had from the Bosch GCM 12 SD. This saw had previously spent nine-months sat in storage so, before I could really put it to the test, it literally needed to strip it down to clean, check and replace any necessary components. Before we go any further, I’d like to start by looking at the condition of the saw as it arrived…

Read on…

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