Olly Writes

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Tag Archives: magnetic

Magnetic Knife Block Video

If you’re subscribed to my YouTube channel then you’ll already know that I recently uploaded a video on the making of my magnetic knife block from last year. If you’ve noticed this upload appear twice in your subscription feed then it’s because I have re-uploaded the same video – in the first edition, I was made aware (by several viewers who left comments) that there was an issue with the narration running out of sync and beyond the end of the video footage; prolonging the length with an additional minute of black screen.

This has been corrected in the second upload. I’d like to leave the original video in its place because it’s already received a number of interactions. What I realised was that I made a mistake in recording and positioning the segments of narration before a final edit of the individual scenes – let that be a lesson to any other YouTubers or video-uploaders out there! It seems as though the strips of narration are not attached to the video timeline and so, as that shifts, the audio remains where it was.

So, from now on, this is the kind of schedule I’ll be following when editing a video for uploading. It is a lengthy process and I like to save as many individual versions of the video in as many states as you see listed below:

1. Initial edit and trimming of scenes.

2. Adding transitions between scenes.

3. Playing through the video to check and increasing the play-speed of any scenes where appropriate.

4. Recording and adding the narration.

5. Adjusting the sound levels between scenes and narration before a final check and then, the uploading!

Thanks for reading and I hope you like it. 🙂

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Magnetic Knife Block Design

While I’m pressing on with various things at the moment, I recently came up with an idea for a magnetic knife block design that I might like to make for my own personal use. I was asked about making a universal knife block a few months ago. Typically, those are fitted with carbon fibre rods or sometimes bamboo skewers. I couldn’t find a supplier of the plastic rods but that one didn’t come in to fruition anyway. Someone else later asked me about magnetic blocks (where the knives stick to the side of a block) and that’s what got me thinking with this design.

Magnetic Knife Block

I’ve grown up in a house with ‘common sized’ slots in each block. But how do you know what knives you’re going to need? Their size. Their quantity and what if my future plans change and I really want to get in to cooking and preparing food? That’s where I like these ‘unrestricted’ designs.

My own brief illustration is quite typical of what you might expect from an upright magnetic block. I see it as an opportunity to use up some scrap wood, with an interior constructed of offcut strips in a stack-lamainated formation, one on top of the other. With end-grain exposed at the ‘front’ end of the block, it could become quite a feature. There would be magnets embedded in to either side and these would then be sealed behind a thick veneer of something – in this case, I’ve drawn it in brown but I quite like the appearance of lighter woods (maple and sycamore) in a kitchen environment.

Both the shape and dimensions are only approximate at this time but, each time I head out to the workshop, I feel a desire to come up with a few scrap wood projects before I end up giving the stuff away!

Thanks for reading.

Jointer Knife Setting Jig

After tidying up my router table this morning and adding the final touches with the featherboard accessories (photos to follow in another post), I spent the afternoon machining up some timber for a small job (yes, timber – not dusty MDF!) and also set about making a pair of simple-but-effective setting jigs for the knives (blades) on my 6in wide CT150 surface planer (jointer).

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WorkSharp DMT Diamond

Today’s video came up in my YouTube subscription feed, recently:

There’s also the full review of this system, over at New Woodworker.com.

This looks like an excellent solution for owners of the Work Sharp system. These Magna-Discs do appear to be available from Rutlands, for those of us in the UK. It’s just a shame that the initial outlay is so steep… But, if they last as long as the claims (fifty-times a standard abrasive disc?!) then, it’s got to be worth the investment for any tradesman or professional who uses their tool sharpener on a daily basis.

It’s the use of magnetic technology that really appeals to me. Could this be the future for abrasive discs? If only they can find a way to reduce the costs… I know that not everyone gets along well with the velcro hook-and-loop attachments. I’ve come across posts where woodworkers say that the backing pads on their sanders have lost their grip, for example (it’s not uncommon).

Thanks for looking.

Post Christmas Purchases

January is often seen as a good time of year to grab a bargain on, well, anything – but, here, I’m talking about woodworking tools, of course! Well, not exactly spinning circular saws or routers but the recent seasonal discounts offered by Axminster and Rutlands have allowed me to stock up on a few essential purchases, in addition to the brand-new Bench Cookies I recently added. These aren’t all intended to be used solely in the workshop; several items have been purchased with scribing and on-site fitting in mind and for general carpentry jobs that could become the ‘bread and butter‘ of my future furniture making business.

It all started with this set of Stabila spirit levels

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Can I Play with Magnets?

Rare earth magnets are kind of the things that can have a million and one different uses in a woodworking ‘shop. You’ve probably seen them available from places like Axminster, generally sold in quantities no greater than ten. Once you’ve started using a few of them, you soon begin to realise just how beneficial they can be and that initial pack of ten doesn’t go very far at all. That’s why I’d advise you to take a look at some of the listings on eBay, where bulk packs of fifty or even one-hundred magnets can be purchased for a very reasonable sum of money. I recently stocked up on a quantity of 8mm and 10mm diameter magnets (5mm and 7mm thick, respectively) and I thought I take the time to show you what I’ve been using them for so far. Perhaps this will give you some ideas for your own workshop.

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