Olly Writes

Woodwork, writing, walks, DIY and more!

Tag Archives: Furniture Making

Picture Frame and Mitres

My next video on YouTube should document the making of a small picture frame made from a minute quantity of English walnut. Today, I’m going to share with you a bit about making the mitres on each of the four corners, as I took an opportunity to try and saw blade I’d not tested before and I’d like to share some of my thoughts on that.

Mitre Cutting Time!

I also decided to make a mitre-cutting jig for my mitre saw and there will be a shorter video showing how I made that, to be uploaded within days of the picture frame project going live.

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We’re Talking ‘Tallboy’

Last Friday, I did take a trip down to Yandles in Martock, Somerset for their annual Autumn Woodworking Show. Not for the first time though, I managed to leave without spending a penny (in both senses!). That’s not to say that they didn’t have a nice selection of timber on offer – there was maple, cedar, American cherry and sycamore, among others. Many of the boards were near-sap-free and the prices didn’t look too bad either. I just hate shuffling around confined spaces with hundreds of other people also trying to do the same.

So, while I couldn’t make a decision on which or what to use on the door panels to complement a bathroom cabinet (I already have the ash) that I was complementing, I’m back at the drawing board (Google SketchUp) with my mind set on an alternative project with which to end this woodworking year…

It’s a tallboy; a narrow, single-width chest of drawers for the storage of clothes.

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New Video Mini-Series!

I have a second short-series for you in video format! It centres around the construction of a “simple” stand for rolls of paper towels commonly found in most kitchens, with an octagonal theme.

I’m also hoping that I’ll be able to keep this one down to only a two-part series, with the conclusion to follow later on this week (most of it’s been filmed; it just needs to be cut and spliced together).

Another fairly straight-forward build but, as always, comments are very welcome (don’t worry – I’m already well aware of the fact that my everyday voice lacks enthusiasm! :roll:). I’ve tried to take on board some of the points that Stuart commented on after the second Cutting Board video so, feedback is always welcome. Have I gone a bit OTT with the scene changes?

I would’ve updated this blog much sooner but, I’m having some “issues” with the Visual Editor in WordPress and, as yet, I have not found a solution or a cause for it… I have tried using several different browsers but, they all lead to the same end result. Have any other WordPress bloggers experienced similar trouble with new posts lately?

Thanks for reading and, of course, for watching!

End-Grain Cutting Boards Video (Part 1)

I’ve just finished uploading my latest video to YouTube! It’s the first in a short series on how I recently made a small batch of ‘end-grain’ cutting boards. I like to think there are some techniques that you won’t have seen before (in fact, I managed to avoid using my table saw throughout it all! 8-)) but, all comments are welcome; good and bad; both here and directly on YouTube.

[If the video won’t load properly here, please follow this link.]

Instalment number two isn’t very far away. All the footage has been loaded on to my computer and I just need to sit down and organise it all (the real time-consumer!). In my next series of videos, I’ll try to talk more… 😳 There’s not a lot I can do about the visual quality right now, unfortunately. It’s a bit of an experiment for me so, any feedback would be most greatly appreciated. 🙂

What do you like? What don’t you like? Is there something I could’ve done more of? Maybe less of that? I appreciate that not every woodworker will appreciate the sounds of Joe Satriani and Sammy Hagar among others…! 😉

Thanks for looking. Hope you enjoy the show. 🙂

Making Your Own Dowels

If you’re a follower or reader of my Twitter feed then, you’ll probably have noticed that I’ve had some problems with YouTube recently. I have no idea what caused this (or, the cure) but, for a good week or so, I couldn’t get any of the pages to load. Now that the situation has improved, I’ve been able to catch up with some of the many videos waiting for me in my Subscriptions feed; one of which shows yet another method for producing your own dowels:

Matthias Wandel is what you might call a “wood engineer“. If you haven’t seen his website before then, have a look at WoodGears.ca. He’s got lots of interesting ideas on working with wood.

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An Abrasive Message

Very shortly, I intend to have an update for you on the progress of the new and simple DVD wall shelf that I’ve been documenting recently. It’s almost at the point where I’m ready to claim that project as ‘complete‘, after applying the first coat of finish this afternoon. Before that, of course, I had to give the entire unit a thorough sanding – here, comes a timely reminder to keep an eye on the condition of your abrasive discs, pads, belts and sheets…

These Hermes sanding discs clearly show you when the abrasive is just about ready for a replacement – as the ‘grit’ wears away, the white colour disappears to be replaced by yellow. In addition to that, you’ll also find they don’t cut as efficiently as before…

I’m as guilty as any other woodworker for storing and continuing to struggle with tired, worn abrasives – that’s the only reason why the packs of ten discs I purchased two-years ago have lasted this long!! 😀 [That white disc in the centre of the photo is unused and fresh out of the box.]

You may not fully appreciate just how prepared that old sheet of abrasive for a trip to the bin until after you’ve fitted a used a brand-new one! If in doubt, throw it out! 😉

Thanks for reading.

Bench Repair (Part 4)

With the seat assembled and the bulk of the work on this repair job complete (ignoring the other seat, which suffered a similar fate to the first one, very recently), the last step before finishing was to create two new rails that would allow me to attach this new seat to the legs of the existing frame.

I didn’t have enough meranti left to do this but, I did have some iroko which is, in all fairness, likely to outlast the rest of the entire bench structure, if left untreated over the next few years! I used one of the original rails as a template to directly mark all the significant features on to the new wood (length, hole locations, mortise positions and the radiused ends).

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Bench Repair (Part 2)

Over the weekend, I made further progress on the bench seat repair and started by preparing all my previously sawn stock down to finished dimensions.

When I’m working with timber that’s been at least partially sawn on a circular saw, which leaves a much cleaner finish than most bandsaw blades, I find it helpful to scribble over the sawn faces to void confusion later. Unless your planer knives are razor-sharp, it can sometimes be tricky to distinguish the prepared face and edge from the two other surfaces… On a few occasions, yes, I have made the mistake of referencing off the wrong face and edges when feeding stock through a thicknesser! 😳

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