Olly Writes

Woodwork, writing, walks, DIY and more!

Tag Archives: cabinet maker

We’re Talking ‘Tallboy’

Last Friday, I did take a trip down to Yandles in Martock, Somerset for their annual Autumn Woodworking Show. Not for the first time though, I managed to leave without spending a penny (in both senses!). That’s not to say that they didn’t have a nice selection of timber on offer – there was maple, cedar, American cherry and sycamore, among others. Many of the boards were near-sap-free and the prices didn’t look too bad either. I just hate shuffling around confined spaces with hundreds of other people also trying to do the same.

So, while I couldn’t make a decision on which or what to use on the door panels to complement a bathroom cabinet (I already have the ash) that I was complementing, I’m back at the drawing board (Google SketchUp) with my mind set on an alternative project with which to end this woodworking year…

It’s a tallboy; a narrow, single-width chest of drawers for the storage of clothes.

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End-Grain Cutting Boards Video (Part 1)

I’ve just finished uploading my latest video to YouTube! It’s the first in a short series on how I recently made a small batch of ‘end-grain’ cutting boards. I like to think there are some techniques that you won’t have seen before (in fact, I managed to avoid using my table saw throughout it all! 8-)) but, all comments are welcome; good and bad; both here and directly on YouTube.

[If the video won’t load properly here, please follow this link.]

Instalment number two isn’t very far away. All the footage has been loaded on to my computer and I just need to sit down and organise it all (the real time-consumer!). In my next series of videos, I’ll try to talk more… 😳 There’s not a lot I can do about the visual quality right now, unfortunately. It’s a bit of an experiment for me so, any feedback would be most greatly appreciated. 🙂

What do you like? What don’t you like? Is there something I could’ve done more of? Maybe less of that? I appreciate that not every woodworker will appreciate the sounds of Joe Satriani and Sammy Hagar among others…! 😉

Thanks for looking. Hope you enjoy the show. 🙂

An Abrasive Message

Very shortly, I intend to have an update for you on the progress of the new and simple DVD wall shelf that I’ve been documenting recently. It’s almost at the point where I’m ready to claim that project as ‘complete‘, after applying the first coat of finish this afternoon. Before that, of course, I had to give the entire unit a thorough sanding – here, comes a timely reminder to keep an eye on the condition of your abrasive discs, pads, belts and sheets…

These Hermes sanding discs clearly show you when the abrasive is just about ready for a replacement – as the ‘grit’ wears away, the white colour disappears to be replaced by yellow. In addition to that, you’ll also find they don’t cut as efficiently as before…

I’m as guilty as any other woodworker for storing and continuing to struggle with tired, worn abrasives – that’s the only reason why the packs of ten discs I purchased two-years ago have lasted this long!! 😀 [That white disc in the centre of the photo is unused and fresh out of the box.]

You may not fully appreciate just how prepared that old sheet of abrasive for a trip to the bin until after you’ve fitted a used a brand-new one! If in doubt, throw it out! 😉

Thanks for reading.

Bench Repair (Part 2)

Over the weekend, I made further progress on the bench seat repair and started by preparing all my previously sawn stock down to finished dimensions.

When I’m working with timber that’s been at least partially sawn on a circular saw, which leaves a much cleaner finish than most bandsaw blades, I find it helpful to scribble over the sawn faces to void confusion later. Unless your planer knives are razor-sharp, it can sometimes be tricky to distinguish the prepared face and edge from the two other surfaces… On a few occasions, yes, I have made the mistake of referencing off the wrong face and edges when feeding stock through a thicknesser! 😳

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Brushes Down!

At last!! The final three coats of emulsion have been applied to my workshop’s walls!! Now, behind my sliding compound mitre saw, the limited light reflects back at me, instead of disappearing off in to the once deep, dark and murky masonry pores.

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Renault Kan-Do!!

It’s almost time for me to say goodbye to the bruised and abused Ford Escort, a surprise eighteenth birthday present back in 2003, which has surprised all the doubters in making it this far. If it wasn’t for my own negligence in failing to check the level of oil in the engine back in September then, no doubt, I’d be looking to renew both my tax and insurance at the end of this month. Instead, the old hatchback from 1994 is destined for a scrap yard – well, it never was going to be the ‘ultimate woodworking vehicle‘…

A few weeks ago, I was presented with the opportunity to purchase a 1999 Renault Kangoo van with a 1.9lt diesel engine and, having watched many used Citroen Berlingos and similar small vans go for the best part of £2,000 on eBay during the past six-months, I would’ve been mad to have dismissed the chance to purchase this one, with only 68,000 miles on its clock.

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Nogging Along

In order to strengthen any floor; to prevent the joists from moving and also to reduce any risk of the floor sagging, it’s important to add at least one series of noggings (note the third, silent G!). In many cases, as with my floor, only one set of noggings down the centreline of the new floor is required. Where a floor covers a greater span though, it may be required that you have an additional two lines of noggings.

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Hanging Out

With the 7x2in joists all cut to length, ends re-sealed and ready to fall in to place, my next job was to set out the positioning and spacings for each of the sixteen hangers (eight on either side) and then, to fit them in to place. Below, you can see a mock-up of what I needed to achieve, where the joist must sit 32mm (1¼in) higher than the wall plates, in order to clear the existing truss-frame by a good 5mm, which had already begun to deflect where I’ve previously used it, in appropriately, to store goods (it’s only 4in/100mm deep and is riddled with woodworm, you see).

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