Olly Writes

Woodwork, writing, walks, DIY and more!

Tag Archives: black walnut

Cutting Board Chasm

This post is mainly for the benefit of those who do not currently follow my Facebook page, where a few of us have already begun a discussion on this. Of course, I’d encourage you to head over there now and to click the Like button if you haven’t done so already!

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When disaster strikes!

I received an e-mail from one of my recent cutting board recipients last night that. When I saw the heading, I knew it wasn’t good news and could only assume that something had gone wrong with at least one of the boards I’d made for them. In my mind; at least one board had begun delaminating along at least one glue line. But, as you can see in the photo above; what actually happened was far more devastating!

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Cutting Board Conclusion

Part 3 and the concluding episode of my Contrasting Cutting Boards series was uploaded to YouTube on Sunday night. Already, I’ve had a very welcome response and, although they’re not everything; at the time of writing this post, I’m averaging one Like for every ten views… And I do like this! 🙂

It’s been quite an enjoyable series to film and I do feel that my editing skills have improved somewhat in the two-years since I made a set of beech cutting boards (another popular series). I found myself with more than one hour’s worth of footage to sort through for each one and I’m pleased that I was able to essentially quarter each of them.

I imagine I’ll pick up more tricks with practice as I can’t imagine the ‘pros’ (highly popular woodworkers on YouTube) allow themselves to climb such a mountain, each and every Friday. Steve Ramsey made an interesting comment recently (it might have been on Keek or in his most recent Mere Minutes video) where he basically stated how and why he tries to keep his videos short (between 5-10 minutes each). With longer videos, he’s found in the past that views tend to ‘drop off’. He also mentioned how the average viewer can kind of ‘make up’ the bits that you don’t show, in between scenes and I certainly feel as though there are only so many times in which someone can sit through a sequence of planing or ripping timber.

I’ve personally received a lot of praise for the detailed, descriptive nature of my content and I want to reassure anyone reading this that you’re not about to lose that in future videos! I do plan to highlight some shorter tips and ideas around the workshop, in between whatever projects I can muster between now and ‘the move’… I’m thinking about the possibility of doing a ‘rundown’-type video on this series. Again, similar to Steve’s Mere Minutes and it’s also something that Laney Shaughnessy and Alex Harris do quite regularly. I’d keep it within the same channel but it might be useful to just sit and look back on things, even if I don’t have many questions to explain or answer.

I’m reluctant to spend any fortune (big or small) on new filming equipment with the uncertainty that lies ahead but I am keen to try and add a narrative to some future videos, to try and counter-act the issues I sometimes have with my voice and speech.

Thanks again to everyone for watching, liking, subscribing and for being here to read this post. 🙂

Part 2!!

I’ve been having great difficulty with Windows Live Movie Maker (now known as just Movie Maker) of late and that is the main reason I’ve been unable to upload Part 2 of my latest cutting board series until today. It’s been a month since part one otherwise and I had been struggling to find the time to sit down and chop through over one hour’s worth of footage but, it’s online now and is available for you to view, share and critique. 🙂

If you’re struggling with the same program yourself, here are some tips that I tried to get it working…

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Coming Together

Just a bit of an update for you on how things are going, as I’m part way between completing the final glue-ups of these boards; making my way in and out of the workshop throughout the course of the weekend in order to remove one board from the clamps and then to insert another.

Crosscutting with a skil saw.

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