Olly Writes

Woodwork, writing, walks, DIY and more!

Tag Archives: american lime

A Bad Turn

I’ve been Keeking a lot lately about a project I started. It was something that I initially wanted to remain as ‘secret’ until a big unveiling with a YouTube video; laminating layer after layer of American lime from my offcuts stash, as the odd follower made their guess or suggestion as to what it might be. Two people were very close and in fact, it you were to halve each of their answers (bandsaw box and a turned bowl) and to bring two of those halves together, you would’ve come to the correct conclusion of a Bandsaw Bowl.

This is why you shouldn’t operate a bandsaw at 21.30…

It was all going so well until I mounted it on a circle cutting jig last night. Now, this beech lump o’ lime looks like to find a space in one of my stocked up bags of firewood, ready for collection by someone… From somewhere.

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New Project – Any Guesses?

I’m writing this post to ask whether anyone reading this can guess what I might be making?

Stack-laminating American lime – but for what?

It’s a way to use up my collection of American lime (basswood) offcuts (although, that has little relevance). I’m stack-laminating them in such a way because I do not have anything as substantial available as a stock size. I think I’ve added two more layers since taking this photo but the height or depth is not critical.

Obviously, once I’ve finished laminating, I’m going to have to cut it in some way, if you notice all the overhang…

Thank you for reading. I look forward to reading your suggestions! 😉

Getting a Grip

It must have been late-2009 when I made a plywood base cabinet to sit directly underneath my chip extractor (an Axminster ADE1200). Small workshops are all about making the most of whatever space you can find. As this extractor wasn’t very tall (no more than 5ft, to the top of the filter bag), I seized on the opportunity to increase its height by a good foot and to keep some of my ‘junk’ from off of the floor.

This extractor lives in a corner of the workshop, which makes it very difficult to access directly, when the time comes to change the bag. So, it’s often easiest for me to clear a space ahead and to roll the unit forwards. A problem occurs then because the weight of the unit is still on top, with the motor and so, attempting to drag of push the extractor out of or in to hiding often results in it tipping up. That’s why I decided to finally make and fit another handle lower down, which would allow me more direct control over the ‘weight-less’ half of the unit, directly supporting the upper load.

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DVD Wall Shelf (Part 3)

For one reason or another, it’s been almost two-months since I lasted updated you on the American lime wall shelf I was building to re-house my over-blown DVD collection, following a house move at the end of March. I finished the project (with several coats of Chestnut Acrylic Lacquer) shortly after part two but, it was only last week that I got around to the task of hanging the unit on a plasterboard wall…

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DVD Wall Shelf (Part 2)

It seems that I’ve skipped an update, here, on the simple DVD wall shelf that I began working on two-weeks ago – my apologies for that. After roughing out all the timber for the four shelves and two sides last time, I was still left with a small collection of cupped boards. This cupping wasn’t as severed as with the 10in-wide boards I’d started with but, I knew it was still likely to cause me some problems later on.

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Too Many DVDs?

When I first started woodworking at home, back in the summer of 2005, the very first piece I made was a simple ‘Craftsman-style‘ wall shelf in pine (Scandinavian, joinery-grade redwood). I took the plans directly from a book [The World’s Best Storage and Shelving Projects] and modified various dimensions in order for the unit to accommodate my stash of DVDs. Despite its garish appearance with the tung oil finish and the crudeness of some of the joints I used (particularly the beech dowels used to peg the shelves), this wall shelf made the move with me to my new home at the end of March this year. All in spite of the fact that, with a total capacity for forty-eight DVDs on each of the two lower shelves, it wasn’t long after the completion date that my DVD collection had over-grown [thanks, Play.com and CD-WOW!!] and I was having to stack cases on top of the unit to try and keep things ‘organised’!

One Shelf... Too Many DVDs!

It’s taken me almost six-years to make this decision but, I’ve decided now that the time is right to build a new wall shelf with increased capacity!

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American Lime

Following on from my guide to working with PAR (or not…), I want to show you more on what I get up to with this regular supply of “painted furniture” work. To start with, let’s talk a bit about the timber itself – which, in case you hadn’t gathered from the heading above, is American lime.

Lovely lime.

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Working with PAR

At one time or another, you’ll probably have considered buying your timber as PAR (planed-all-round). Perhaps only in the beginning, when the lure and cost of your own planer/thicknesser (or, even, two separate machines) seemed like one giant leap too many when you were just getting in to this past-time. While timber and other tools would put enough of a burden on your bank balance, it has to be said that there’s a lot of money to be saved in the long-term, if you’re able to prepare your own boards. Also, you’ll be able to control the selection of timber and grain patterns for each component.

Then again, if you don’t do a lot of woodworking in a single year (some people have real lives, or so I’m told…), you may as well be better off just letting the yard do all the hard work for you. Whatever your situation, there are a few things you need to be aware of, if you’re considering letting someone else do all the prep-work for you, and paying for it…

3.6m long, and it's a bit of a squeeze!

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